Desserts and Cakes, What's Cookin'
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Rabanadas – The Portuguese Christmas eggy bread

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Rabanadas, they always had a special place in the typical Portuguese Christmas dessert table, along with other fried and eggy goodness. They are one of the main dishes that infuses Portuguese households with the sweet smell of sugar and cinnamon during this festive time of the year.

Ingredients:

  • Soft baguette, brioche or any type of soft bread ( In Portugal, around Christmas time, you can find a specific baguette for rabanadas in most supermarkets)
  • 1/2 liter of milk
  • 6 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla paste
  • sugar
  • cinnamon

Preparation:

First of all, it is important to mention that in this recipe you should be using stale bread. The staleness will help the bread to absorb all the milk and egg mixtures. Slice the baguette in 2 centimeter thick slices. You will need separate containers, one with the milk mixed with the vanilla paste, other for the beaten eggs and the final one with the sugar and cinnamon mixture. It is like an assembly line, first soak the slice of bread in the milk on both sides and then in the eggs. Place each slice in a hot frying pan with oil and fry it until golden on both sides. If you do not soak it enough it will be dry in the middle, if you over soak it, the bread might fall apart. Try to find the optimal timing in the first try. As the slices are ready, remove them from the frying pan, coat them in the sugar and cinnamon mixture and place them in a glass bowl with a lid. As each batch is ready, place them in the bowl and repeat the process until there is no more bread. The remaining heat in the bowl will allow the sugar and cinnamon to melt and it will start creating a syrup in the bottom. The rabanadas should be perfectly moist and gooey on the inside. If you are an eggy bread fan, go give this recipe a try!

 

 

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1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Christmas’ Eve’s Eve, Christmas’ Eve and Christmas | Storysketching | Pedro Loureiro

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